Leaving Fallen Trees to Encourage Wildlife

We manage 360 acres of woodland at Llanforda with the help of a woodland management contractor. This involves an ongoing programme of maintenance, thinning, felling and replanting. As the trees reach 10-15 years old, they begin to compete for space, light and nutrients and growth starts to slow. Thinning is the removal of some trees or parts of trees within woodland.

Trees support the lives of many organisms. They are used for food, shelter and as sites for reproduction. Many animals also use trees for resting, nesting and for places from which to hunt or capture prey. When the trees mature, animals are able to enjoy delicious fruits and foraging opportunities. Branches free of leaves serve as perches for birds of prey to watch for movements of prey below.

Fallen trees also play an important role in ecosystems by providing wildlife habitat, cycling nutrients, aiding plant regeneration, decreasing erosion and influencing drainage and soil moisture and carbon storage.

Dead and decaying wood is actually an important part of the woodland ecosystem and a healthy wood should contain about 30% deadwood. As deadwood is decomposed, by fungi, bacteria and other life forms, it aids new plant growth by returning important nutrients to the ecosystem. Those seemingly dead trees are actually teeming with life! Species found on deadwood include beetles, hoverflies, flies, parasitic wasps, moths, bugs, sawflies and spiders.

Decay is simply the process of rotting or decomposition. The terms tree decay and tree decomposition can be used interchangeably to describe a biological process where wood’s cellulose and lignin convert to carbon dioxide and water and the remaining nutrients are simply released into the soil.

Without a mixture of microhabitats, biodiversity is lowered as many species are unable to thrive. Thousands of invertebrates rely on deadwood, which in turn provide food for a whole host of other animals. There are many types of deadwood within the woodland, providing homes for a wide array of wildlife. Piles or stacks, dead hedgerows and stumps can mostly be left to their own devices.

An incredible number of birds, mammals, reptiles and insects depend on dead trees for nesting, food storing, hunting, roosting, resting shelter or food. The insects that move into deadwood don’t harm living wood.

We manage 360 acres of woodland at Llanforda with the help of a woodland management contractor. This involves an ongoing programme of maintenance, thinning, felling and replanting. As the trees reach 10-15 years old, they begin to compete for space, light and nutrients and growth starts to slow. Thinning is the removal of some trees or parts of trees within woodland.

Trees support the lives of many organisms. They are used for food, shelter and as sites for reproduction. Many animals also use trees for resting, nesting and for places from which to hunt or capture prey. When the trees mature, animals are able to enjoy delicious fruits and foraging opportunities. Branches free of leaves serve as perches for birds of prey to watch for movements of prey below.

Fallen trees also play an important role in ecosystems by providing wildlife habitat, cycling nutrients, aiding plant regeneration, decreasing erosion and influencing drainage and soil moisture and carbon storage.

Dead and decaying wood is actually an important part of the woodland ecosystem and a healthy wood should contain about 30% deadwood. As deadwood is decomposed, by fungi, bacteria and other life forms, it aids new plant growth by returning important nutrients to the ecosystem. Those seemingly dead trees are actually teeming with life! Species found on deadwood include beetles, hoverflies, flies, parasitic wasps, moths, bugs, sawflies and spiders.

Decay is simply the process of rotting or decomposition. The terms tree decay and tree decomposition can be used interchangeably to describe a biological process where wood’s cellulose and lignin convert to carbon dioxide and water and the remaining nutrients are simply released into the soil.

Without a mixture of microhabitats, biodiversity is lowered as many species are unable to thrive. Thousands of invertebrates rely on deadwood, which in turn provide food for a whole host of other animals. There are many types of deadwood within the woodland, providing homes for a wide array of wildlife. Piles or stacks, dead hedgerows and stumps can mostly be left to their own devices.

An incredible number of birds, mammals, reptiles and insects depend on dead trees for nesting, food storing, hunting, roosting, resting shelter or food. The insects that move into deadwood don’t harm living wood.